Sixth form college teachers to get a pay rise of up to two per cent in line with school teachers

Following negotiations between the National Education Union (NEU) and the Sixth Form Colleges Association (SFCA) sixth form colleges in England set to see pay rise

Teachers in sixth form colleges in England will get a pay rise of up to two per cent, backdated to September 2017, following negotiations between the National Education Union (NEU) and the Sixth Form Colleges Association (SFCA).

This week the SFCA colleges’ national body agreed to increase its pay offer to match the September 2017 increase for teachers working in schools. The agreement will give sixth form teachers on points one to six of the national pay scale a two per cent rise from September 1, 2017, and teachers above point six of the pay scale a one per cent rise from the same date.

Dr Mary Bousted, joint general secretary of the National Education Union, said: “Sixth form college teachers will be pleased that their pay will increase in line with school teachers for another year. The National Education Union worked hard to achieve this deal for its members, who showed their resolution to get a fair deal by rejecting the previous offer. The increase is, however, still below inflation and the NEU will continue to lobby to secure fully funded higher pay for teachers in schools and colleges alike.”

The agreement was reached after NEU members had rejected the previous pay offer and agreed to be balloted for industrial action if necessary.

The agreement will keep pay for teachers in sixth form colleges in line with that of school teachers, after the 2016 pay agreement restored that parity after several years’ break. Sixth form college teachers’ pay, unlike that for school teachers, also retains fixed pay scale points and has an agreed annual pay progression process.

The NEU will continue to lobby the government to provide more funding for sixth form colleges, as well as for schools, as the post-16 sector has suffered even greater real-terms funding cuts than schools since 2010.

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